Capicola Gold

By Douglas Weinstein
Published on: November 23, 2018

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For centuries the butchers on the island of Corsica have been curing a particular cut of pork, a muscle running from the neck to the fourth rib, called capocollo (or capicola). The word is a compound of the works capo (head) and collo (neck). Dry-cured and sliced very thin, is it similar to prosciutto or other cured ham products that are well-marbled and served as a salume.

This recipe features the capicola cut, but instead of curing the meat, we will roast it and serve it with an accompanying  tangy mustard sauce with South Carolina roots – otherwise known as Gold, from Lillie’s Q. This is one of the most amazing pork cuts of meat we have ever experienced – find a butcher and see if you can procure one of these amazing gems. Melt in your mouth goodness.

 

1            4 lb cut of pork capicola

1            Pork dry rub of choice (ours consists of chili powder, pepper, salt, brown sugar,

1            Bottle of Gold finishing sauce

3            Gold potatoes, chopped for roasting

.5 lb      String beans.

 

  1. Rub capicola with dry rub. Wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.
  2. Remove pork from fridge and let sit for 2 hours.
  3. Preheat oven to 325 degree F. Roast pork to 165 degree F internal temperature. Remove from oven and tent with foil. Let rest for 10 minutes before slicing.
  4. Prepare roasted potatoes – sprinkle with salt and pepper and 2 tbsp olive oil. Roast in 325 degree F oven for 20 minutes, stirring once or twice.
  5. Prepare string beans. Boil in salted water for 5 minutes, then rinsed under cold water for 2 minutes.
  6. Plate pork, potatoes and string beans and pour a generous amount of Gold onto the plate for dipping. Everything can be dipped into this sauce, it’s amazing!
Douglas Weinstein

Douglas Weinstein

Doug is the managing editor and co-founder of the Technology Insider Group. He is also the executive editor of the forthcoming Technology Designer Magazine, that debuts January 2019. Previously, he was the co-founder and Executive Director of the Elf Foundation, a non-profit organization that created Room of Magic entertainment theaters in children's hospitals across North America.

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